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Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's
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TOPIC: Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's

Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's 5 years ago #846


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  • Jenna
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You cant help but to have seen news reports on the recent ban of imports on Ash trees in the news but what is 'Ash Die Back' and what could it mean for the future of the British countryside!

Chalara fraxinea, is a fungal disease which is thought to have formed first in trees in Poland as long ago as 20 years, it's impact is hard and in the case of Poland has led to the death of as much as 90% of the Ash tree population.

In recent years the disease has worked its way across Europe causing devastation, countries like Holland have been heavily effected in 2010, 2011 and 2012.

As the name suggests the disease manifests it self predominantly by infecting the host around the leaf or branch junction, this in turn creates a dead leaf or branch and then the host tree appears to die back. Over time the disease infects a greater number of branches until the tree is overwhelmed and dies.



In February 2012 it was found in a consignment of infected trees sent from a nursery in the Netherlands to a nursery in Buckinghamshire. Since then it has been found in a number of locations including a car park in Leicester; a Forestry Commission Scotland woodland at Knockmountain, near Kilmacolm, west of Glasgow; a college campus in South Yorkshire; and a property in County Durham.



So should we be concerned? Without doubt YES.

What can you do?

1. Be vigilant – Chalara dieback could appear in ash trees anywhere in Britain, especially where young trees imported from continental Europe have been planted. Early action is essential if we are to eradicate this disease from Britain before it becomes established.

2. Inspect - Frequently inspect any ash trees in your care, and especially any which have been planted during the past five or so years. Make yourself familiar with the symptoms of Chalara dieback. There are other causes of ash dieback, so it is important to distinguish them from Chalara, however, if in doubt, report it.

3. Report it - Report suspicious symptoms to one of the following:

Forest Research Tree Health
Diagnostic and Advisory Service
Tel: 01420 23000
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Forestry Commission Plant
Health Service
Tel: 0131 314 6414
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Fera Plant Health and Seeds
Inspectorate
Tel: 01904 465625
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

4. Buy with care – Be careful when buying plants to buy only from reputable suppliers, and specify disease-free stock. A list of countries where C. fraxinea is known to be present is available from the Forestry Commission Website.

www.forestry.gov.uk/chalara
Last Edit: 5 years ago by Jenna.

Re: Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's 5 years ago #847


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I have linked the Community Website with the AshTag_Adapt twitter page so that information on this subject is kept up to date. If you would like to know more about the AshTag project please see the organisations website where you can obtain an app to help identify and report cases of Ash Dieback.

ashtag.org

Re: Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's 5 years ago #851


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  • Chunky
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I remember the countryside before we lost all the elms, I hope we don't have same devastation with the Ash's too... wouldn't be so bad if the disease effected blooming Leylandii

Re: Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's 5 years ago #858


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You may be interested to now that Elms are now being reintroduced back into the countryside. The new trees are either a variant of the American Princeton Elm (Ulmus americana) which proved resistant to the US strain of Dutch Elm Disease (but at that time not the European!) or grown from cuttings from what has proven to be a few British trees with some form of natural resistance.

A good example of naturally resistant Elms is the now protected 'Preston Twins' at Brighton.

At this time both sources of trees are not exactly cheap as numbers of new trees are still low however over time as they multiply they should become more affordable and a greater possibility of a 'mass' re-population take place in the British countryside.

I did have a possible source for a donation tree for the village however it seams at the minute there is along waiting list.

Re: Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's 5 years ago #864


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Re: Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's 5 years ago #869


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Unfortunately the Forestry Commission have confirmed today an outbreak in Bedfordshire, although the location has not yet been announced I am led to believe it's in mature woodland near Sandy.

Re: Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's 5 years ago #871


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there is talk of washing your shoes after leaving woods to prevent the spores being transported in leaf mold.

Re: Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's 5 years ago #874


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Central Bedfordshire Council is asking residents not to put any leaves or branches from ash trees in their garden waste collection or take them to any household waste recycling centre to prevent the disease spreading after finding the infection in woods in Bedfordshire.

Central Bedfordshire Council say they now should be put in the black bin instead.


I'm not sure if was bad research or poor timing but just hours before the outbreak in Bedfordshire was confirmed a Department of the Environment spokeswoman said: “No incidences have been reported in the region at all.”.... so all the information I post is coming from the rather better informed Forestry Commission database.

Graeme Cannon, Ashridge Estate manager, advised to clean footwear and bike and car tyres of mud and earth when they get home after visiting woodland containing Ash.

I will post the latest map as soon at its released today.
Last Edit: 5 years ago by Jenna.

Re: Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's 5 years ago #881


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As promised the latest map.



Confirmed outbreaks in the areas of Stony Stratford (19 Miles North West) & Stewkley (17 Miles West) in recently planted trees and Sandy (16 Miles North East) in established woodland.

Currently within the UK:
Nursery sites - 15
Recently planted sites - 55
Wider environment, e.g. established woodland - 65
Last Edit: 5 years ago by Jenna.

Re: Chalara fraxinea, Dutch Elm disease for the 2000's 5 years ago #886


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I see this morning they have now found it at a site in Bicester too.

The way this is spreading is a fore gone conclusion that its only a matter of time? I hear nothing about stopping or killing the disease so is it a case of once you find it that's the end of it all the Ash trees in that area?

I herd that the government were holding a cobra thingy on friday about Ash dieback, I have not heard anything about what was said or what they were going to do, have I missed it?
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